In the face of expanding online catalogues of ready-to-live houses, ‘Consuming Interiors’ proposes an alternative way to restore the disappearing connection between user and habitat – without the need of populating it with personal belongings.

The contemporary need for mobility demands minimal and portable personal goods, as addresses are changed every few months. In the sharing economy, renting a space with all the necessary inventory is growing increasingly popular. But how, then, to establish a relationship of intimacy and familiarity with an interior already occupied by belongings with no particular meaning?

In ‘Consuming Interiors’, pieces of furniture conventionally meant to store and accumulate objects turn into goods to be used-up and consumed by the manipulation exerted by the resident.